Reusing

It may be possible to use some items again rather than throwing them away:

Furniture, toys and books

Charity shops are always grateful to receive unwanted books, toys and brick-a-brac. Hospitals too are often grateful for donations of good quality toys.

See if there is anywhere that sells second hand books or even furniture rather than buying new every time (and take any old items back to get reused again)

If one of your household appliances breaks down, see if it can be fixed rather than throwing it in the bin straight away and buying a new one.

There are a number of local charities and organisations that may be interested in your second hand furniture and appliances if they are in good condition. Some of these are:

Clothes and fashion

Go vintage: Do things like shopping second-hand and vintage. There are stacks of vintage and charity shops in Newark, Southwell and Ollerton. You can also buy on sites like eBay and Depop.

Clothes swap and swishing events are becoming popular around the district and many events are free or raise money for charity.

Buy less: If you can, have a sort through your wardrobe and only buy what you really need. Spend a bit more on quality items that will last rather than fast fashion.

If you have time on your hands this weekend why not have a really good look in your wardrobe - there may be some clothes that you have forgotten about!

Look for eco-friendly materials: Look out for more natural fibres - go for cotton over polyester for example. Not only do they feel a lot nicer when you wear them, but they don't contain things like microfibres that go into our water and into marine life when we wash our clothes.

Swap clothes don't shop!

Clothes swap and swishing events are becoming popular around the district and many events are free or raise money for charity. 

By swapping clothes instead of buying new, we can avoid contributing to the negative cycle of fast fashion, have a positive impact on the environment, get a great deal, and maybe find something completely unique that you won’t see anybody else wearing.

Paper and card

Use scraps of paper as telephone message paper and when using the computer, print on both sides of the paper.

Paint

Garden recycling

Join our garden recycling scheme where all garden material is composted and used to improve local soils

Composting at home

Composting at home is a great way to reduce the volume of waste going to landfill. Everything from torn up cardboard to fruit and vegetable peelings, and grass cuttings to the contents of your vacuum cleaner, can all go in to help create a nutrient rich compost for your garden.

Upcycling containers for growing your own salad, fruit and veg

You can recycle old tubs and planters and other containers including tetrapaks and egg boxes. You can make your own newspaper flower pots and use plastic bottles for protecting plants or like mini-greenhouses.

Old yoghurt pots are the perfect size for this purpose - just puncture holes into the base for drainage. Old fruit punnets make excellent miniature seed trays, while toilet roll tubes are ideal for starting off deeper-rooted vegetables such as peas, beans and sweetcorn.

In the garden one person’s trash is really is another’s treasure!

And don’t forget the trick of dangling old CDs on coloured string to ward off birds from your crops.

Build a bug hotel

Bug hotels can provide a safe hideaway for insects, bees and beetles, ladybirds, spiders woodlice and even toads and hedgehogs! You can build one at any time of year and it provides the opportunity to get inventive and recycle things that are lying around including old pallets, planks of wood, bricks, garden canes, prunings, old roof tiles, moss, dry leaves, pine cones, logs, and whatever else you can find!

Rechargeable batteries 

Rechargeable batteries can be used over and over again

Some of the best batteries will last for at least 200 charges before their capacity decreases significantly.

Although disposables are often cheaper and don’t require a charger, if you think of how many you’ll have to buy in just one rechargeable battery’s lifetime, it’s pretty clear there’s a great saving.

And that’s not the only good thing about them. Rechargeable batteries are far better for the environment, one of them being that they use a lot of energy and resources in their production for such a short lifespan.

Contact us

Waste Management
Newark and Sherwood District Council
Brunel Drive
Newark
Notts
NG24 2EG.

customerservices
@newark-sherwooddc.gov.uk

01636 650000

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    Castle House
    Great North Road
    Newark
    Notts
    NG24 1BY

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